Colors of Colina: Burgundy

As I have been doing my Humans with Bouquets series this year, naturally, I have developed a relationship with some of the people who have participated. Colina is one of those people, and I am lucky enough that she is local, and graciously agreed to shoot with me a few more times. Aside from the unique beauty that she possesses, to me, Colina inspires color. She has an incredible wardrobe and a lovely color sense, as well as a beautiful style. What more could I ask for? I decided I wanted to create a human-focused color series. With the coming of autumn, the possibilities are almost infinite; so, as a prelude to the season I chose the color burgundy. I simply told Colina what the general color theme of the bouquet that I was making would be, and here are the results!

Flowers: pokeweed, ranunculus, zinnia, rice flower, dahlia, foxglove, anemone, geranium, smoke, dusty miller Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Credits:

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by Nathan Underwood Colina's dress from Anthropologie and shoes from Swedish Hasbeens

Humans with Bouquets: Lily

As I have mentioned in some of my other Humans with Bouquets posts, this series is about people who I admire. Today's human is no exception whatsoever. Lily has been a dear friend of mine for nearly fifteen years now. I first met her when I was a college student visiting home and working during my time away from school. We worked in retail together, and if we wrote a book about our experiences, it would be a best seller - guaranteed! Needless to say, we have quite a lot of unique memories together. Lily has always been a positive and very strong character - honest, loyal, and full of words of wisdom. What I have come to admire most about Lily is that she has chosen to dedicate her life to helping girls in her home village in Kofele, Ethiopia. In 2008, Lily visited home, and after having been away for so long, she was shocked by the level of intense poverty that so many people were living in. It was during this trip that she decided to make a difference, and founded the Tangible Hope Foundation. For the past several years, Lily and Tangible Hope have been sponsoring girls from the village and ensuring that they have adequate clothing, housing, food, health care, and schooling. Running on a shoestring budget, Lily sponsors 51 girls - her "daughters" - from Kofele.

Through her patience, tenacity, and hard work Lily has been able to accomplish so much. In February, she was honored by the Dalai Lama as a 2014 Unsung Hero of Compassion. Thank you Lily for participating in this series!

Fort Baker on a hazy/foggy morning. Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N.R. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Flowers: tulip, ranunculus, garden rose, geranium, peony, honeysuckle, bottlebrush buckeye, smoke, dusty miller (flower) Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N.R. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N.R. Underwood / nruphoto.com

The sun started coming out just as we were finishing up. Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N.R. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Credits:

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by N.R. Underwood

Garden Cabbage Arrangement DIY

Not every vase must be made of glass, plastic, stone, or wood. The possibilities of using unique vessels for your arrangements are nearly endless. In today's post, we use a cabbage as the vessel for a simple but beautiful design. tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

What you will need:

  • Medium-size purple cabbage
  • Small piece of floral foam to fit inside the hole you will carve in the cabbage (soak in water 20 minutes prior to using)*
  • One bunch Dusty Miller
  • One bunch each white and purple Freesia
  • Two bunches of Knautia "Melton Pastales"
  • Floral clippers, a cutting board, and a small paring knife

*  I find that floral foam is useful at times (such as in topiaries), but try to limit its use given that it isn't great for the environment (non biodegradable) and can be messy. A kenzan could be used as a replacement in this arrangement.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Take off the outer leaves of the cabbage to remove any bruised or unsightly pieces. Then, using the cutting board and paring knife, remove the bottom of the cabbage so that it can sit level without moving.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Using your knife, hollow out the inside of the cabbage where your floral foam will reside. Be careful not to remove too much of the cabbage so that it maintains its sturdiness.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Place the pre-soaked floral foam in the space that you have carved out of the cabbage.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Starting from the outside of the floral foam, insert the Dusty Miller.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Once you are happy with the look of the Dusty Miller, start placing your white and purple Freesia into the floral foam. It can be at varying heights and you can bunch your colors together as desired for a more natural look.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Fill in all empty spaces with the Knautia. I like to use both opened and buds for variety and texture.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Examine your centerpiece from all directions once finished to ensure that it looks full and beautiful. Enjoy!

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Credits: All photography by Angie Cao