Delightful Daphne

Along with many other spring flowers this year in Northern California, daphne came early. I absolutely adore daphne - it has such a lovely, aromatic flower. So, of course the first chance that I got to get my hands on it, I did just that and made this arrangement. In my opinion, daphne is beautiful just by itself, which is why I currently have a vase filled with just it alone on my bedside table. For this arrangement, however, I decided I wanted to use some of the loveliest, most delicate flowers I could find, and added hellebore, ranunculus, fritillaria, and a few others.

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Flowers: daphne, tulip, fritillaria, hellebore, ranunculus, narcissus, pieris, tuberose Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

The delightful daphne. Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Credits:

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by N.R. Underwood

Winter Blossoms

Blossoms have been blooming all over San Francisco since the beginning of January which is way too early. Yes, my friends we have spring blossoms in winter; however, I'm not complaining one bit! So, I was inspired to put this shoot together and call it 'winter blossoms'. If I were getting married in winter, I would love to have blossoms like this in my wedding. To me, all blossom branches are so beautiful by themselves that you really don't need to do much. I also stumbled upon the loveliest anemones at the flower mart, so I decided to create a centerpiece with blossoms, anemones, and some tuberose for added beauty and aroma!

To go along with my theme, I wanted to create a soft, delicate, and very aromatic bouquet. So, I chose a number of very delicate and aromatic flowers along with an absolutely amazing ranunculus imported from Japan. It was as big as a peony and just as lovely!

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Flowers: tuberose, narcissus, daphne (an absolutely heavenly aromatic trio), muscari, hellebore, anemone, fritillaria, ranunculus Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Flowers: crabapple blossom, anemone, tuberose Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: N. Underwood / nruphoto.com

Credits:

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by N. Underwood

Carnation Centerpiece

Carnations have a reputation as a cheap flower in the United States, and their usage remains as such in many retail florist's shops. It wasn't always this way, as the status of the carnation was much higher in the early 20th century as a symbol of love and devotion (more so than the rose), and remains so in many parts of the world. There are some carnations that are not particularly exciting; however, there are many fantastic examples that have wonderful color and texture, and can be used with great success in the most refined of arrangements. I came across these beautiful antique pink carnations at the San Francisco Flower Mart a few days ago, and used them along with yellow ranunculus, white and pink hellebores, ornamental kale, and pink Daphne in a dinner party centerpiece this weekend. Even these beautiful examples remain inexpensive, as a bunch of 20 was $9.

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood