Bright Thanksgiving Centerpiece

When I think of Thanksgiving, a fireplace seems to be the perfect scene. Even in Northern California, it is usually reasonably chilly at Thanksgiving, so that fire really hits the spot. When I put together this arrangement, I wanted to use a color palette a bit outside the typical realm of Thanksgiving colors. I think that while you can still see autumn in this arrangement, it also has a more colorful element that you would not generally expect to see on a "traditional" Thanksgiving table. The lighter pinks, especially, lend a soft and happy quality to this piece.

I feel that the leaves on persimmon trees are just the perfect shade right now - a light brown with hints of pink and yellow which compliment the vessel and assist in creating a color combo around it. The peonies and the ranunculus are just a reinforcement of those autumn-dusted leaves of the persimmon tree.

I believe that it is always fun to try something new and step outside the traditional look once in a while - what about you?

Flowers: rose, peony, poppy, ranunculus, orchid, kumquat, tangerine, japanese maple, persimmon branch Bright Thanksgiving Centerpiece / Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Bright Thanksgiving Centerpiece / Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Bright Thanksgiving Centerpiece / Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Bright Thanksgiving Centerpiece / Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com | Photography: Nathan Underwood / nruphoto.com

Credits:

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by Nathan Underwood

Autumn Leaves with Garden Rose

Autumn is here (in the Northern Hemisphere) and it is one of my favorite seasons! During autumn you might not get peonies, but the variety of color, texture, and beauty that this season offers is simply heavenly for a floral designer. The leaves in my neighborhood are turning, and the other day I found these perfectly lovely "fallish" varieties, so I thought it was a perfect way to welcome the season! I love that these are all branches/leaves with just one flower variety - garden rose - mixed in.

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com

Flowers: Japanese maple, Japanese privet, rain tree, garden rose, crabapple Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com

Begin with the maple on one side of the vase and the privet on the opposite side - allowing their leaves to droop naturally. Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com

Add the rain tree to the "maple side" - the contrasting colors are beautiful! Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com

Add the roses throughout the arrangement. These roses are so beautiful - I just could not get enough of them, and they lasted quite a long time.

Add the crabapple to the side by privet for a little color and texture, and you are done! Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com

Kiana Underwood / tulipina.com

Credits:

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by N. Underwood

For the Love of Quince DIY

As you know, I love to incorporate fruit into my arrangements. Quince is a fruit that is not extraordinarily common in the United States, but was very common for me growing up in Iran, and I love using it today in some wonderful Persian dishes. This unripened quince is the star, but it is bolstered by the lovely colors of the ranunculus and garden roses. Some Queen Anne's lace adds texture and completes the piece. tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Choose a cylinder container (here I have used a marble utensil container) and begin by placing the quince branches inside, allowing them to rest naturally in the vase tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Add the Queen Anne's lace tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Continue with the garden roses tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Finally, add the ranunculus - which lends little bursts of color throughout the arrangement tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

tulipina.com / Kiana Underwood

Credits

Styling and design by Kiana Underwood Photography by N. Underwood